Dean Koontz has a new heroine

Dean Koontz combines Richard Condon’s The Manchurian Candidate with Ira Levin’s The Stepford Wives to create his latest pulse-pounding suspense thriller The Silent Corner (Bantam Books, June 2017).

Jane Hawk’s husband commits suicide, but he isn’t the only one to die by his own hand. When Jane, a highly-trained FBI Special Agent, takes bereavement leave and investigates the sudden rash of unexplained deaths, she and her five-year-old son are threatened by mysterious strangers who know all about her. Jane’s only hope to save her son and herself is to go entirely off the grid — to disappear into the silent corner where no one can track her movements or whereabouts.

Because those hunting Jane and her son don’t play nice, Jane can’t either. She becomes a rogue agent, a cold-blooded killer, and a thief.

Like Lee Child’s Jack Reacher, Jane Hawk has skills that allow her to survive against impossible odds. She goes on the offensive and ruthlessly kills people who deserve killing. We cheer her on each time another bad guy bites the dust.

The Silent Corner is only the first of at least three Jane Hawk novels. The Whispering Room will be out next January.

Exciting, thrilling, suspenseful, and well-written, I recommend The Silent Corner to everyone who enjoys a good read.

Grunt Hero is a fast and fun read

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What more can aliens throw at the humans of planet earth than they already have? First came the Cray with their power-destroying EMP; then came the mind-controlling infestations; finally, the earth itself is being Terra-formed to become a breeding ground for aliens. This is truly the end times.

The world as we knew it is no more; The United States no longer exists as a political entity, although Russia apparently still does (and China, too). NUSNA (the New United States of North America) has formed an alliance with the Cray and their masters. So Mason and Team OMBRA must reluctantly ally with other aliens who call themselves Khron. If you thought author Ochse threw in everything including the kitchen sink in the first two novels, this third novel includes Aliens from captured UFOs who’ve been held hostage at Area 51 for more than 70 years. The fast-paced storyline doesn’t stop, and people close to him continue to die on Lieutenant Mason’s watch just as they did when he was a simple grunt. But true heroes — even reluctant heroes like Mason — don’t let the dead and dying slow them down. They forge ahead because it’s all they know to do.

Although we learn the war between the human-like Khron and the more alien Umi has been going on almost forever, the battle for earth is almost over. The warring parties will have to continue the fight elsewhere.

What the world needs now — perhaps more than ever before — is a hero. But who is left to step up to the plate and pinch-hit for humanity? The author has already polished off most of hero squad. Fort Irwin and everyone still there was flattened by an asteroid. Are there no grunts left to be canon fodder?

This third volume in the Grunt-series raises as many questions as it answers. It’s action-packed like the first two books, and it’s a fast and fun read. I recommend Grunt Hero to all lovers of military sf.

And don’t be surprised if a sequel appears with Mason visiting other worlds to continue battling the Cray and their masters.

Why so many serial killers?

 

“If every age gets the lunatics it deserves, then our age of anxiety deserves those who are in the grip of a compulsion.” Can’t Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions by Sharon Begley (Simon & Schuster, February 2017) hypothesizes that “compulsions are a response to anxiety, and modern life is filled with overwhelming anxiety.” Compulsions offer us an illusion of control in a world gone mad. “We cling to compulsions as if to a lifeline, for it is only by engaging in compulsions that we can drain enough of our anxiety to function.”

The idea behind Begley’s book was so compelling that I simply had to buy it. I’m a compulsive bookaholic who needs to know what’s inside every book (which may be an impossible task) or continuous wondering will drive me crazy.

That’s my excuse, anyway, for buying books, and I’m sticking to it. I’ve become a compulsive book hoarder. Books are more than a compulsion with me, they’re an obsession. And, as long as I have a book to read or a book to write, I don’t feel the need to kill anyone.

Is compulsion an anxiety disorder? Is it a personality disorder? An addiction? A syndrome? What’s the difference between Impulsive and Compulsive drives? Everyone feels anxious. Everyone is occasionally impulsive or compulsive. Should impulsive and compulsive behaviors be considered pathological only when they become so excessive they interfere with normal life functions?

Can we control our impulsive and compulsive behaviors? When do we know we need to?

Serial killers are addicts who get pleasure from risk-taking. They thrive on anxiety rather than feel a need to alleviate anxiety. They’re addicted to the pleasure they get from causing pain. They know their actions are wrong, but they can’t stop until they get caught. Seeing how long they can get away with doing something dangerous and forbidden is half the fun. They’re more concerned with what happens when they do something than when they don’t do something. They’re thrill addicts who need regular fixes or suffer the pains of withdrawal. Serial killing is addictive behavior, It isn’t compulsive.

Compulsive behavior, on the other hand, results from worries about what will happen if one does not possess something (knowledge, an object, followers on Facebook, love, money, drugs, bullets, soldiers, words in print, etc.) in sufficient quantity or quality to prevent disaster. It is the opposite of risk-taking. In one’s mind, possession is seen as the only thing that can prevent a future catastrophe from occurring.

Addictions can become compulsions only when worry about what may happen if you can’t continue the addictive (pleasurable) behavior takes over. You no longer get pleasure from risk-taking, but must take different risks to avoid pain caused by discontinuing the risky behavior. Like feeling compelled to kill in order to cover your tracks and not for pleasure. Like stockpiling books you’ll never have a chance to read.

When anxiety becomes fear, compulsions can become obsessive. You’re terrorized that unless you get things just right, absolutely perfect, calamity will happen. You, and only you can prevent bad things from happening, especially to ones you love. Only scrupulous adherence to a magical ritual (like buying certain books or writing them a certain way) will prevent disaster.

As a writer of crime-suspense thrillers, I enjoyed this book ‘s insights immensely. It was written in language a layman could understand, covered the gamut of compulsive behaviors, and tried to tie things together in a nice package. More importantly, though, this book taught me that when compulsions serve a useful function and contribute to a successful life rather than destroying it, being compulsive isn’t always bad.

Maybe that means I’m not as crazy as I thought.

Here is my interview with Paul Dale Anderson

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Name  Paul Dale Anderson

Age 70

Where are you from

Born and raised in Rockford, Illinois. Left Rockford for twenty-some years while serving in the Army and to further my education. My wife and I bought a home in Rockford in 1988.

A little about your self `ie your education Family life etc  

My middle name Dale is an Americanization of Dalarna, the province in Sweden where my paternal grandmother came from in 1890. My male cousins on that side of the family all have Dale as their middle names.

I’m an only child. My parents were old enough to be my grandparents, and the one thing we did together every day was read. Both of my parents were prodigious readers. They read to me, and I read to them. I’m also a perpetual student, and I attended the University of Illinois, Rockford College, University of Chicago, Loyola University…

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The Secret Life of Souls

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I love novels written in present tense. It gives such immediacy to the action that you feel you’re right there in the middle of things.

The Secret Life of Souls by Jack Ketchum and Lucky McKee (Pegasus Books, November 2016) is written entirely in present tense and frequently switches POV between Delia Cross, her twin brother Robbie, their mother Patricia, their father Bart, their agent Roman, and their dog Caity. You are actually inside their heads, You see through their eyes, You feel what they feel. For brief periods of time, you become—actually are—them.

You learn what it’s like to share memories and thoughts with another person.

And that’s what makes this story so wonderful. Oh, sure, there’s a lovable urchin on the brink off stardom (Delia), an equally-lovable mutt (Caity), abominable parents (Pat and Bart), an unscrupulous agent (Roman), and even a suspicion of the supernatural at work. It’s a complicated story about a dysfunctional family and a special kind of love that endures despite everything that happens.

The pacing is superb. The first twenty pages are a bit slow-going compared to the rest of the novel. But once bad things start happening, it’s a non-stop roller-coaster ride all the way to the end.

 

Angels Versus Angels

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When fallen angels live amongst humans, there’s always hell to pay.

I’ve been a fan of Billie Sue Mosiman’s stories since the 1980s, and LOSTNESS (January 2017) is no exception. A sequel to BANISHED and ANGELIQUE, this tale is set in 1940 with many of the same characters from BANISHED. Angelique returns, still in a child’s body. Nisroc (Nick) travels in Europe with Jody, the midget. Henry, the shape-shifter, is back, too. But fascinating new characters are introduced in LOSTNESS—Ladina, Jules, Tina, Will, Graham, Duma, Monty—to complicate the storyline. The great battle between angels—between the fallen and the unfallen—is about to begin.

My only gripes with the novel are the mention of the CIA and a few minor things a good copy editor would have corrected. The Central Intelligence Agency didn’t exist in 1940. The closest thing was the FBI, or Military Intelligence, or possibly the OSS.

I love Mosiman’s images of angels allowing their wings to expand. I love being inside Jules’ head when she dream-travels.

Once again, Mosiman shows there’s more in heaven and earth than dreamt in our philosophies.